Saving Grace – The Inquest Begins

Saving Grace, an Amazon top 100 Hot New Release

Victorian Gull Inquest

Professor Vernon Pennington, called as the first witness in the Charles Petrie Inquest. Professor Pennington suspected suicide, however none of the evidence supported his theory. Therefore, the question remained: who poisoned Charles Petrie?

Victorian Crowd

Crowds gather outside the Seabank Hotel as the inquest into the poisoning of Charles Petrie reveals sensation and scandal. People are so keen to get into the courtroom that they are bribing police officers and court officials.

Victorian Florence Upset

Grace Petrie breaks down while questioned by advocate Lewis Murdoch. Murdoch is convinced that Grace poisoned her husband, Charles, and his questions lead the jury to share his opinion. With the gallows rope beckoning, can Grace’s advocate, Daniel Morgan, save her?

Victorian Verdict

As the witnesses reveal the scandals in Grace’s life, the press make eager notes for their newspapers, and the search for justice is lost amidst the sensation. The courtroom drama of the Victorian Age, everyone had an opinion on who poisoned Charles Petrie. I have constructed the courtroom scenes in Saving Grace from these newspaper reports, each authentic word adding detail to the drama.

Victorian Inquest Gull

The inquest into the poisoning of Charles Petrie reaches its conclusion. Will Grace hang for the murder of her husband, or can Daniel Morgan and Professor Vernon Pennington, called to give last minute evidence, save her?

Victorian Foreman

The court of inquiry has heard the evidence and the foreman of the jury rises the deliver the verdict. Is Grace guilty? Who poisoned Charles Petrie? You can discover the answers and the solution to the greatest poisoning scandal of the Victorian Era in Saving Grace, available now for the special pre-order price of $0.99/£0.99/€0.99.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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