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Hannah's Diary

A New Service For Readers

With millions of books on Amazon alone to choose from, where do you start? You could accept the titles that Amazon promotes – books published by ‘major publishers’, or through Amazon themselves. Or you could wade through the thousands of new books released each week. In terms of finding a good read, all of the above might not be that appealing. However, now there is a third way. Read on.

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A group of authors known collectively as The Writers’ Cooperative have created A Reader Recommends as a Facebook page and website. The page came about from a general discussion between authors. With millions of books to choose from, where should readers go to make their selection? They thought it would be a nice idea to assist readers in the selection process by highlighting their favourite books and by showcasing books from talented up-and-coming authors.

The authors in  The Writers’ Cooperative nominate their favourite books and these books are allocated a place in the schedule. They also accept nominations from authors not associated with the Cooperative and they have a weekly slot for these books. Their aim is to present the reader with a wide variety of quality books, all genres, styles and subjects are considered. The one thing they have in common is the q-word, quality.

There are no restrictions for inclusion on A Reader Recommends, although spammers are frowned upon and their posts will be removed. Everyone else is welcome. The aim is to connect readers with authors, introduce readers to new and classic books, and enrich the reading experience for all who love books.

A Reader Recommends is an exciting new venture for writers and readers. Books posted on the Facebook page can reach over 1,000 readers. Some services charge hundreds of dollars for that sort of coverage, but A Reader Recommends is free. Click this link, like the Facebook page and discover a new author and a great book today.

Categories
The Writers' Cooperative

Rebecca Bryn

I am delighted to feature Rebecca Bryn, a very successful and creative novelist, on my website. Here are some details about Rebecca and her books.

AUTHOR BIO

Rebecca Bryn lives on a smallholding in West Wales with her husband, rescue dog and a flock of sheep. She loves walking, gardening and painting. She write thrillers with a sprinkle of romance, mystery, heartbreak, and a twist. She also paints the stunning coastal scenery in watercolour and has work in private collections worldwide.

LINKS

Website: http://www.rebeccabrynandsarahstuart-novels.co.uk
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/rebecca.bryn.novels
Twitter: http://twitter.com/rebeccabryn1
Pininterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/jandrcoulson/
http://www.independentauthornetwork.com/rebecca-bryn

REBECCA’S BOOKS

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Psychological thriller set in West Wales.
A reader wrote : ‘Gripping family saga set against the backdrop of a rural and very insular community. When Alana Harper inherits a cottage from an aunt she never knew, family secrets slowly begin to unravel, but only lies and half-truths emerge. Crimes from the past, including child abduction lead to present day acts of revenge. This is a book you will not want to put down until you know the truth of what went on all those years ago. Alana must face a past of which she was totally unaware and people she should be able to trust who want her to stay ignorant. Excellent storytelling.’
http://mybook.at/SilenceoftheStones

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WW2 thriller set partly in a Nazi death camp in Poland
A reader wrote: ‘Books about the Holocaust are never easy reading and it’s an emotive subject. From this comes a beautiful tale of survival and love. I shan’t give away too much but the pace of the story is constant, the characters are full and human with frailties like anyone else. The horrors of Auschwitz are terrible but love & humanity prevail. The conclusion is a surprise and expertly written. I thoroughly recommend this book.’
http://mybook.at/TouchingtheWire

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Dystopian thriller set in the High Atlas Mountains of Morroco
A reader wrote: ‘This is an inspiring, thought-provoking book unlike any I’ve read. Set far in the future, this is the story of clashing societies and their interpretations of the second coming. Some groups cover war, while others are peaceful by nature. It’s very dystopian, but incorporates interesting political, social, and spiritual elements into the story. At the heart of it all is a story of love. A couple fighting against all odds who end up kidnapped. Heartbreak and loss seem eminent, but beneath it all is hope.

There are many characters in this book, but they were so well developed and I found it easy to follow along, while at the same time getting lost in the story.

Rebecca Bryn’s writing style is lovely, and there were so many deep, emotionally charged issues underlying the story itself. Although the tale is futuristic, it has this old worldly feel to it, and I loved the author’s ability to paint the scene and evoke powerful emotions from me as a reader. 5 stars.
http://getbook.at/WhereHopeDares

http://smarturl.it/YoureNotAloneAnth A charity anthology in aid of MacMillan cancer nurses.

Booktrailers:
https://youtu.be/HwKe9viyokU (Touching the Wire)
https://youtu.be/a_ENzGBApk0 (The Silence of the Stones)
https://youtu.be/0HpcNRzH3t0 (Where Hope Dares)

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Rebecca and Kes at home in Pembrokeshire

Q: How did you come to be a writer.

About twelve years ago, a friend had a serious accident. She’d always enjoyed writing stories as a child and I suggested she write while she was recuperating. She began sending me hand-written chapters by snail mail. I’d comment on them and return them. Her therapy turned into a desire to be published and, as I thought she had talent, I offered to proof-read for her. Paper and barely-decipherable squiggles of biro became e-mail attachments and, one day, quite out of the blue, I sat at my computer and typed Chapter One. Jem frowned and scanned the horizon. Nothing.

I was hooked and my first novel, Destiny, was conceived. Convinced it was the best thing since sliced bread, I sent it off to an agent, stating that I wanted to grab mankind by the throat and shake him. (I was passionate about my subject, as you will gather.) The agents duly returned it saying it wasn’t for them.

A reality check, one of many: the message was always the same. You write well and we really enjoyed your story but don’t feel it is something we can market. After ten years of this I found myself with several stories they’d really enjoyed, none of which they felt were marketable.

It’s frustrating to know you have a story people would enjoy reading, but marketing – profit – gets in the way. I wasn’t writing for money. I was writing to be read and enjoyed… to get across a message, to share my hopes and dreams, my passions – Not marketable.

Q: Is this what got you into Indie publishing?

Partly. About eighteen months ago, after a close brush with success with an agent, which frankly terrified me, I decided to take control of my own destiny and join the growing ranks of self-published authors.

It’s been a near vertical learning-curve, an immense amount of work (agents and publishers earn their cut) and a very rewarding experience. I’ve met talented and generous people, both authors and readers, and had fabulous reviews: a vindication of my determination. I’m one very tired, emotionally battered but very happy bunny.

Q: Have you had any rejections that have inspired or motivated you?

Oh yes. Every rejection was a motivation to improve. And those readers who’ve taken the trouble to give me feedback have inspired changes, new exciting paths, and improved characters. I take criticism very seriously. It almost always leads to huge improvements in my writing and my story. If nothing else, it makes me question everything I write and think more deeply.

Q: If you were trying to describe your writing to someone who hasn’t read anything by you before, what would you say?

That’s a hard one. I write about difficult subjects: things that matter to me and to others – injustice, loss, guilt, forgiveness – what makes people who they are. I like to dig inside a character, let them grow and flourish, and I like to think I make my reader aware of all the shades of grey that lie between black and white, lest they judge my characters too quickly. None of them are perfect, any more than I am.

Before you judge a man, walk two moons in his moccasins, a Native American Plains proverb, is a maxim I live by.

The Silence of the Stones is woven around injustice in the legal system and the devastating effects that injustice has on the convicted and their families. It also delves into injured minds and what drives people to do things they wouldn’t normally dream of doing.

Touching the Wire is partly historical, set largely in Auschwitz… need I say more, except that the research had me in tears and it was a story I was driven to tell. It was published to coincide with the seventieth anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz.

Where Hope Dares, my latest novel, is a rewrite of the novel, Destiny, the story that sparked my writing career eleven years ago. It kept me awake at night thinking about what man is doing to our beautiful planet in the name of profit and progress. Again, it’s a story I was driven to write. Jem is now Kiya: she no longer frowns, nor does she scan the horizon, and Abe has taken on a whole new and more dangerous persona. The story has evolved with me, and several of the events I foretold in the first draft have since come to pass. Most notably the present flooding in the North of England.

Q: The protagonist in Where Hope Dares is Abe. What ten words best describe him

Committed, driven, compassionate, gentle, lonely, religious, great-hearted, guilt-ridden, open-minded, courageous.

Q: Tell us a little about the major areas you had to research for this novel.

Where Hope Dares is set loosely in the High Atlas Mountains, because it was a region that satisfied the geography and probable climate I required to place both my protagonists and the scenario. Though not set in our time, I still had to research much about the mountain terrain, flora and fauna, the areas of Morocco that border the Oum Erribia and south of the High Atlas to the Grand Sahara. Kiya’s people originate in the Horn of Africa so I researched the customs, democracy, religion and history of the Oromo people, which is fascinating and should be a model for all countries’ governments. I collected images that inspired me and posted them on my Pininterest page. I also researched texts from the bible concerning original sin and the second coming. Berber dress and religion was another area plus Catholicism, poisonous plants, sailing a small ship in a storm, the coastal waters of West Africa, surviving a sandstorm and a blizzard. How to build a snow cave, surviving a desert without water, and climate change and sea-level rise, which is a minefield. Fortunately, I was able to call on someone who has done a lot of research on the past, present and possible future climate of our planet. One joy was the proverbs of the Oromo and Native American peoples. Why don’t these wise people rule the world?

Q: Regardless of genre, what are the elements that you think make a great novel? Did you consciously ensure all of these are in place?

A plausible, gripping tale, interesting settings, well-developed characters with whom the reader can empathise, an underlying message of some kind that might inspire or give the reader pause to think, good grammar and writing that flows. The reader should find themselves transported to the place, living the story. Re part two of your question: I try to ensure these things are in place, but my readers will judge if I’ve succeeded.

Q: In which ways was writing transformative for you?

Writing is cathartic. It allows you to put feelings into words, which most people find difficult in real life. There were many parts of my research that gave me cause for concern about our beautiful planet. I think writing about it has helped me come to terms with my own mortality and insignificance. As Raphel in Where Hope Dares observes, while waiting to be sacrificed, mankind is mere grains of sand. Writing has also given me confidence, as did my painting success.

Q: What is it about your novels that you feel make them particularly suitable for book clubs?

They raise questions about religion, society, justice, democracy and fear and hope for our future, but all packaged in stories of courage, faith, sacrifice, hope and, above all, unbreakable love. They also explore the way events shape people, and people shape events and each other.

Q: Do you find yourself returning to any recurring themes within your writing and, if so, are you any closer to finding an answer?

Yes and no, in that order. Recurring themes are the stupidity of war, the insubstantiality of religion, man’s greed and brutality to man (and woman), loss, courage, faith, hope and love, and what makes us who we are – nurture over nature. In a way, that answers the question. We are who we are and we keep repeating the same mistakes. Learn from history or others’ mistakes? If only.

Q: ‘I’ve always said there are two kinds of writers. There are architects and gardeners. Architects do blueprints before they drive the first nail, they design the entire house, where the pipes are running and how many rooms there are going to be, how high the roof will be. But the gardeners just dig a hole and plant the seed and see what comes up.’ (George R R Martin) Which are you?

If I were an architect, I’d have organic flowing shapes. If I were a gardener, I’d have some structure. On balance, I’m more a gardener. I love a garden when it’s slightly out of control, growing wildly and over-stepping its bounds, and I think that’s much how my characters behave. I have a general idea of a plot, my characters decide where that takes them and me.

Q: Do you write under a pseudonym? Do you think they make a difference to an author’s profile?

I do write under a pseudonym. I think when I began I had no confidence that readers would like my novels. I wanted to save myself and my family any embarrassment. As it happens, my readers’ comments have been amazing and inspirational, in fact one actually had me in tears, so, in hindsight, maybe I should have had the courage of my convictions. Does it make a difference to an author’s profile? I really don’t know.

Q: Do any of your books have dedications? If so, to whom and why?

Yes, of course. The notable one is my old botany and zoology teacher, Dr Schaeler, a gentle Polish Jew who lost his family in the holocaust: it was the pain in his eyes, etched into my teenage soul,which partly inspired Touching the Wire. Also, I have cause to be grateful to so many people during the vast learning process of becoming a published author, and far beyond. The Word Cloud, an on-line writers’ group, nurtured my early writing aspirations and I would highly recommend them to any writer in need of creative support. My friend Sarah Stuart, author of Dangerous Liaisons and Illicit Passion, has been a tireless support and inspiration. My elderly in-laws have been a role model throughout my life, my ex-husband wrote an afterword for Where Hope Dares, and has been very encouraging, my children because they say everything I do is rubbish and I love them to bits, my dog for taking me on thinking walks, and not least my husband for putting up with not getting his tea, or his dinner for that matter, mostly talking to a brick wall, generally doing all the things I forget to do, and loving me despite it all.

Q: Have you been involved in any other writing projects?

I contributed a short story for a charity anthology in support of MacMillan cancer nurses. A second anthology is due out sometime in 2016. The first one was called You’re Not Alone and was published earlier this year. My contribution Ooh, Air Margrit can be read at http://www.independentauthornetwork.com/rebecca-bryn if you download Ooh, Air Margrit. It’s an embarrassingly true story.

Q: What are you working on at the moment?

A project close to my heart. I’m 35,000 words into On Different Shores an historical love story inspired by the true story of my great-great-great uncle, James Underwood of Yardley Hastings, Northampton who was convicted of killing a gamekeeper in 1840 and was transported to Tasmania, leaving behind his new wife/girlfriend. (Haven’t discovered who she was yet or what happened to her) The research is fascinating as I’ve found newspaper reports of the inquest, committal and trial, conduct records on board the convict ship, HMS Tortoise, and probation records in Port Arthur. He died aged 93 and is buried in Hobart. I have a lot of research still to do at the Tasmanian end of the story as 70 years of his life are as yet a complete blank. I seem to enjoy writing journeys, and it looks like this is going to be another epic one.

Q: Is your writing plot-driven or character-driven?

Character driven. I have rough idea of a storyline when I begin, but it’s the characters who take it on its devious, twisting, heart-rending route. I let the characters deliver the message and ponder the morals in my stories. I fall in love with them, even the evil ones, and I don’t think I ever really let go of them. They all dwell still, deep inside me, and I deep inside them.

Rebecca Bryn
E-mail: jandrcoulson@outlook.com if you need further info.

Categories
Hannah's Diary

The Writers’ Cooperative

Introducing a new venture. A group of leading independent authors and authors who publish through small publishing houses have got together to form the Writers’ Cooperative.

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The Writers’ Cooperative represents the cream of independent publishing. The authors in the Cooperative publish their books independently or through small publishing houses simply because they choose to do so. Independent publishing is not a modern phenomenon – Charles Dickens published A Christmas Carol independently so that he could retain full artistic control – and the authors featured in the Cooperative, one of whom has been compared to Dickens, are proud to follow in the great man’s footsteps.

If you are looking for a quality book, professionally written and professionally produced, the Writers’ Cooperative is for you. The Cooperative’s authors cover a wide range of subjects, from history to fantasy, from mysteries to romance and I feel sure that there is something there for everyone. So please feel free to visit their website. Hundreds of reviewers have written glowing reviews, thousands of readers have enjoyed these authors’ books. They look forward to welcoming you among their number.

“Feel as though you’re reading the same tired story over and over? Break away from the rigid formula of the big publishing houses and read a true original! These authors deliver the goods.”

http://the-writers-cooperative.com/

Categories
The Writers' Cooperative

C.N. Lesley

This week’s featured author is Elizabeth Hull, writing under the by line of C.N.Lesley. Elizabeth lives in Alberta with her husband and cats. Her three daughters live close by. When she isn’t writing, Elizabeth likes to read and to paint watercolors. She is also a keen gardener (despite the very short summers) and now has a mature shade garden. Once a worker in the communications sector, mostly concentrating on local news and events, she now writes full time, and fusses over her cats. She was senior managing editor of FlashMe Magazine and now is assistant flash fiction editor for Abyss and Apex.

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LINKS

http://cnlesley.com/
http://www.abyssapexzine.com/

The wyvern has hunted for the young outcast all her life; a day will come when, after being rejected by civilisation and the tribes, she must at last face him.

REVIEWS

REVIEW BY JEANNE HASKIN
Author of ‘Love, War and Magic’, Artema Press

Raised in the world of Darkspire Reaches to heal the sick and fear the wyvern, Raven is an immediately accessible and lovable character, for whom the road from servitude to motherhood is paved with persecution, betrayal, and ultimately a showdown for who will command the loyalty of her mate.  At times, the book is heartrendingly brutal, and, at others, filled with a tenderness that inspires happy tears.  Comic relief, in the form of Raven and Connor’s wit, not to mention the antics of Kryling, a much smaller cousin of the wyvern, raises the book another notch from excellent to brilliant.  With layers of complexity that attain additional depth each time I return to the story, this is a book to be read again and again.I cannot recommend it highly enough.
http://www.artemaepress.com/jeanne-m-haskin.html

REVIEW BY LIT AMRI, READERS FAVORITE – 5 STARS

In C.N. Lesley’s “Darkspire Reaches”, when Emperor Chactar order the death of witches by burning, Raven and her foster mother, Margie, leave their village and seek shelter from the very man who is responsible for their misery. In exchange for a secret that Margie threatens to expose, they are granted shelter by the wicked emperor. From that moment onward, Raven’s life continues to change, and she will learn so much more about herself, about Samara Maidens, a Drakken male and the beast Wyvern that has plagued her mind like a nightmare.

I love the cover art by Alex Boca which grabs my interest right away. The dialogue was confusing at first until I figured out the difference of a ‘peasant talk’ and the normal speech that Margie and Raven use. The author’s beautiful writing style easily sparked off interest and my imagination about the story. I rooted for Raven from the beginning as I felt her pain and sympathized with the harsh life that she had to endure. Honestly, I didn’t like the things that happened to a protagonist that deserves so much more. I couldn’t find it in me to like Connor, the Drakken male, at all. Only when Raven accepted him that I followed suit. A tumultuous but otherwise entertaining read, this is an adult fantasy novel with solidly-built worlds, characters and creatures. If you love dragon-themed tales like me, the Wyverns are definitely on par with the dragons as a large, mythical winged creature. http://readersfavorite.com/book-review/11842

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OTHER ENDORSEMENTS/REVIEWS

From Kristell Ink

Darkspire Reaches is a dark romantic fantasy, richly told and with characters so real, you cry for them. C N Lesley is masterful. This is for lovers of Ilona Andrews, Karen Chance, Sherrilyn Kenyon and such like.

***

‘Despite the cover this is not yet another book about magic and dragons. It is about a young woman’s journey of self-discovery. On par with the lowly Wart of Arthurian legend, fifteen-year-old Raven starts out as a foundling, a servant, bound by love to the only mother she knows.’ Review by Wendy Delmater

***

‘Despite this being a suspenseful read, however, Lesley’s words are so rich, so well-crafted, that you don’t want to finish it off so soon–you’d want to nibble the words just to make it last a bit longer. Highly recommended, especially those who have read a lot of fantasy books and are looking for something “deeper.”’ Review by Meghan

***

‘Leslie knows how to build a world, and create–not just characters–but whole races of them, complete with speech patterns and a recognizable cadence that sucks you into her world. From the first chapter you know you are entering a new world, and by the third chapter, you are already familiar with it.’ Review by GG

Do not go gentle into that good night, and the author doesn’t ask it of readers. She leads them gently into the apparently normal, but fascinating, world of an orphan living with a peasant woman. Margie. Raven’s foster mother rescued her when she was new-born and left out in the open as a sacrifice to the Wyverns. Raven’s affinity is with the woods, and the wild deer and rabbits. Margie, a herbalist and fortune-teller, is growing old and Raven helps her by learning about the brews she makes and uses to barter for food and other goods in the nearby village of the golden-haired Angressi people. Only one of them, Tomar, is kind to her and, as Raven, with her different raven hair, grows older, she falls in love and gives him precious potions in exchange for kisses.

Raven sees him seduce an Angressi man’s golden-haired daughter, Katra, and laugh because she’s jealous of kisses that obtained cures for his dog from the girl he calls a First Born savage. Heartbroken, Raven sees a lonely future, despite her magic powers that Margie covets, and her healing hands. The Angressi villagers accuse Raven and Margie of witchery, hurl stones, and give chase, intent on killing them. With nothing more than the clothes they are wearing Raven and Margie are forced to flee, but where? Is Margie wandering in her aging wits or is she Lady Margery Istentor, a high-born woman with a hold over Emperor Chactar who rules as a Living God in a far land?

Is that hold real? Will Chactar grant them sanctuary? Can Raven survive the fate of a Samara Maiden or suffer death at her saviours’ hands if Lady Margery fails protect her? Must she flee and face the danger from the Wyvern’s, the flaming creatures who would have taken her at birth, and have sought her, away from the protection of the woods, all her life? Every chapter, almost every paragraph, ends with a hook to tempt the reader on, right to the end.

This is a very different fantasy. It’s not based on a story that could stand alone as a thriller, as the best of that style of the genre do, or one that depends on instant violent action by werewolves, dragons and other mythical creatures to grab and hold a reader. It truly does start gently, but it’s impossible to leave unfinished if you read the first paragraph. Highly recommended.

AN EXCERPT FROM DARKSPIRE REACHES

The late afternoon sun gave a red tinge to the sky as Raven emerged from the rank tunnels onto the lake shore. She wrinkled her nose in distaste at the smell coming from her wet clothing. Foul water found and polluted every dry shred of fabric on her body.

The hunters used vargel hounds to track, and they would come to this place, so she would spread her scent to confuse them. Raven waded out into the lake, keeping within her depth, then, using the sun as her guide, she headed northwest. They would figure a direct north line of escape to the settlements of the tribes. Raven didn’t doubt Margie would help foster that notion to save her own skin. Again, a bitter smile curled her lips upward. As long as she remained in the water, she left no trail. Almost as an afterthought, she dipped her torch into dull, gray waters and let it fall.

Cold seeped into her bones while she waded on the fringe of the lake. It made a harsh contrast to the foul, but warmer, temperature of sewer filth. Hunger clawed at her insides, bringing another form of cold, one that started from within. The baying of hounds startled Raven into a misstep and she fell; her feet rose to the surface, turning her on her back, the motion warring with the wet clothes pulling her down. If she shed them, she would give the hunters another clue to her passage, and how would she get new ones? The fabric belled out to catch a current and draw her to the center of the lake.

She drifted north to the sounds of the horn call of hunters and the baying of their hounds. Maybe they would burst from the thick line of trees almost reaching the edge of the lake. No pyre could send her spirit on its journey now.

She didn’t know the size of the lake. She hadn’t seen the other side across a vast expanse of water, sunlight sparkling off the waves and ripples. No doubt it drained in the direction of her passage for the current to pull her, but that soon ceased to concern her as the icy waters leeched at her, sucking out her life. A small bird fluttered down to settle on her chest and under his bright gaze, she let herself become enveloped by death’s cold arms.

Waves of sleep lapped around her, washing away hurt. She closed her eyes, feeling the wind on her face, on her body, as she hurtled through the air. For a moment, she imagined herself back at the citadel, throwing herself off a turret to ride the wind. One last image of Margie, a smile lighting her face after a good scrying session, and then flashes of gold lanced through the picture in her mind’s eye until only gold remained. Gold upon gold, fading down into nothing—nothing but a pair of shining, golden eyes.

The sequel, Serpent of the Shangrove, is coming soon. Here is a taster.

Other books
Shadow Over Avalon

This book is first of a series and delves into science fiction, fantasy and myth. Ever wondered what happens when the legendary King Arthur is returned to fulfill his vow to protect his people in the time of their greatest need? In Earth Year 3874 all hell breaks loose. Stay tuned for what happens next.

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Beyond the mists of time, a dying warrior binds his soul to his sword with an oath to protect his people. His shade now rides with the Wild Hunt while he waits for the call of greatest need. When it comes he doesn’t know it is a lie.

A War Maid princess is raised to be fearless, ready to sacrifice her life to defend her kin, but faced with the unthinkable; she must die or devolve into a creature worthy of loathing.
In the undersea city of Avalon, a Seer Acolyte nears the end of his training. He wants to serve on the surface world with the air breathing Terrans, fighting their common enemy instead of serving the Archive. Others have plans for him and the price will be his life.

On Moonbase, a predator finds a threat to the comfortable existence led by his species. How did Terrans diverge to generate an amphibious branch? They must all be killed.

An ageless man sits in a cave conjuring images in his fire. Weave a twist here; pull the weft of compulsion there and the plan is ready to set in motion.  Fortune twists in the strongest of hands.

Arthur and Kai have escaped the threat of Emrys, but now they must face life on the surface world—and all the fearsome creatures that dwell there. But just as they assemble the beginnings of a fighting force, they discover a vital component to their safety has been compromised. This means a return to Avalon, where Arthur has an unexpected encounter with the untrustworthy Merlin. The magician’s orders are clear: Arthur must find the sword to save the surface-and Avalon. There is no alternative.

Kiri Ung, leader of the Nestines and ultimate controller of the Terran slaves on the surface, needs Arthur in order to ensure of the continuance of his species. With the Nestine Queen dying, failure means ultimate extinction. Wherever Arthur goes, so goes Kiri Ung. Whoever finds the sword first gains control over all humanity. But simply gaining possession of this powerful artifact is not enough to wield its power. Let the battle commence.